Chinese New Year, Part II

A week after the first lot of drawings, the lion dancing performances intensified but I still fitted in some sketches in between all the rushing around. If you would like a larger view of the sketch, just click on the image

This is a shop entrance that sells Chinese ornaments and decorative hangings. If you think the doorway is jam packed you should see the inside.

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Usually around 3pm we get to have something to eat, usually…

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This is a pole jumping performance, where the lion jumps, runs, swings, bounds, cavorts ;P across a series of 4-10ft poles with very little cushioning below. As you can see in the tree it was a bit windy that day, not great conditions for jumping.

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While waiting for our next orders,  I sat on the footpath opposite Market City (a shopping centre) and started to sketch the old features of the building. I didnt get far as I bumped into an old family friend I hadn’t seen in a while.
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Our next performance I tried to capture the firecrackers going off behind the lion, but it just looks like a christmas tree. Ha, ha!cny2014_14LRThe school also does dragon dances, which I dont have the muscle for (you have to hold it up with a pole, run and move it from side to side). This was drawn at our gym where everything was stored for the new year.
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Again waiting for the lion dance to start. This was out at Flemington in front of the local bbq shop. A queue started to form which wasn’t there when I first started.cny2014_10LR

Back in Chinatown for another peformance. The Sydney mayor and other politicians were doing the rounds with us, but I think the crowds were more excited by seeing about five lions together. It looks like a paparazzi moment.cny2014_11LR

Getting one of the vehicles ready to head out for a performance.There is an art (or science) to packing a vehicle full of lion dance equipment.

cny2014_12LR One of the last venues on my schedule was the Randwick racecourse for a corporate function. Unfortunately we couldn’t wait around outside where the horses were, but hidden away from the approaching guests until we had to perform. I would have much rather drawn them than a boring race track.cny2014_13LR

Cheers,
Meegan
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Chinese New Year

All sketches drawn with a black Artline pen and coloured with a waterbrush
All sketches drawn with a black Artline pen and coloured with a waterbrush

I’m a member of a kung fu school in Sydney (although to be more accurate, a lapsed student for a few years now) but when I can I help out at Chinese New Year with lion dancing duties. For those unaware of what lion dancing is please check out this link to my school, Jin Wu Koon‘s website. Admittedly I haven’t been to this in a couple of years too and limited myself to just playing cymbals.

The three lion heads waiting patiently for the festivities to begin.

As there is always a lot of waiting time to start I took my sketch book along. And Chinatown in Sydney is always quite interesting to draw any ordinary day of the week.

Another patient onlooker waiting for the "show" to start
Another patient onlooker waiting for the “show” to start
…okay, he wasn’t that patient. He moved around every ten seconds.

Enjoy!
Meegan

Harvest Moon Festival

Many Chinese celebrations do not have fixed dates, like Christmas or New Year, they are instead governed by the appearance of full moons. The Harvest Moon Festival celebrates the change in season, and the main day is when the moon is at it’s brightest, fullest and highest in the sky. For those in the Northern Hemisphere it is a Mid-Autumn festival, but for us “Southerners” it is the beginning of Spring.

I belong to a martial arts school where lion dancing is one of its disciplines. As part of these lunar celebrations we walk around Chinatown visiting stores and restaurants to wish them good luck. They in return wish us good fortune by tying a red packet with money in it to a head of lettuce or choy. However it is not easily handed over, the lions have to reach them as they hang from door ways or awnings, even if it means climbing a 10 foot pole.

 

 

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